MAYD to Birth: At Your Doorstep

Promoting gentle, empowering mother journies…

Jude

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Gretchen, age 22.

 Before I was even thinking about having babies, I had it in my head that when I did have a baby, of course I would get an epidural. Why go through all that pain when I didn’t have to? But when I found out I was pregnant, it didn’t take me long to decide I wanted to give birth naturally. I had a friend who had showed me some Hypnobirthing videos and after more research, decided that’s the route I wanted to take. My husband and I took a 5 week course, and felt more than confident that we could do it.

When I told my OB we wanted a natural birth, he pulled out some statistic that most women who go in wanting a natural birth, end up not doing it. It made me mad, but more determined for this natural birth to prove this guy wrong. (That’s also when I should have found another doctor but I just didn’t want the hassle.) Jude’s due date was November 8. In the weeks approaching, I had some Braxton-Hicks contractions and was dilated to a 2-3. Every time I felt a big contraction, I’d hurry and pack the hospital bag. But the contractions would stop not too soon after they started. A week before my due date, the Dr. stripped my membranes. I thought for sure it was going to put me into labor because I started to get heavier contractions, but after a week, nothing happened. The Dr. told me that if I still hadn’t gone into labor by the next week, to come see him and they’d send me over to the hospital to induce me. I wasn’t really excited about it. I’d been warned that it’s sometimes painful to be induced and I wanted the baby to come naturally, but after a week I couldn’t take it anymore.

The morning of November 14, we went to the Dr., all ready to have this baby. Well, the Dr. neglected to tell me that we wouldn’t be going straight to the hospital that day. They had to call and schedule and maybe I’d go the next day if the hospital had room for me. I wanted to punch this guy in the face but my husband didn’t think that was a good idea, so we went home and waited for the hospital to call and tell us we could come next morning. It was the longest day ever recorded in history but we got a call that night from a nurse telling us to come early in the morning. We arrived at the hospital at 6:00 AM on November 15. We signed all the paperwork and got in our room and at about 7:30 AM they hooked me up to the pitocin. I was working on my relaxation when my Dr. came and broke my water and found out that there was meconium in the water (which isn’t uncommon for overdue babies.) They had to put a tube in to dilute the amniotic fluid to make sure Jude didn’t swallow any of the meconium. And then the monitor they had on me wouldn’t stay on so they had to insert one to keep track of my little baby. It was definitely hard for me to relax and get in a comfortable position with all those wires and tubes strapped but I made sure to keep breathing through the contractions, which were getting stronger and coming every 2 minutes. I was soon at 5 cm when the nurses were having trouble with the monitor again. It had fallen off of Jude and they were trying to get it back on while I was having major contractions. My awesome nurses worked fast in between contractions to get that monitor back on. With the monitor back on, the nurses told me I should be dilating 1 cm an hour but not more than an hour later, I was at 8 cm and feeling ready to push. I pushed for maybe an hour and half, maybe two hours and made it through with the encouragement from my awesome nurses, my mother, and my sweet husband. At 1:15 PM, Jude was born. What a relief.

My first thoughts were (in order), “Yay! My sweet baby is finally here!” “Oh. My. Gosh. I just gave birth naturally. In your face Dr Baxter!” Jude weighed 10 lbs 10 oz and was 22.5 inches long. They rushed him over to the cleaning station to check on him and make sure he didn’t swallow any of the meconium, and since he was so big, they were worried about his blood sugar levels. I was very sad I didn’t get to hold him right as he came out, but after he was cleaned and I was stitched up, I got to finally hold and nurse my sweet baby boy. This is what I’d worked so hard for. This is what I’d imagined not just for the 9 months that I was carrying him but for my whole life as I pictured having my first child. I’m proud to say that I gave birth to my baby naturally. I’m proud that my body can do that. I can’t imagine giving birth any other way.

 1. When did you decide you wanted to deliver your baby naturally? 
 When I first heard about Hypnobirthing and watched the birthing videos, I knew that’s how I wanted to deliver my baby.

2. What reasons or factors went into your decision?
I had heard about all things epidurals can do to harm you and your baby and to slow down labor and I knew that’s not what I wanted. Plus the idea of a big, long needle scared me more than giving birth naturally.

3. What did you do to prepare for natural childbirth? (midwife, classes, methods, books, etc.)
 We took Hypnobirthing classes from Fiona Judd in Orem, UT. She was wonderful and I’d highly recommend her class. Find her info at http://www.ihypnobirth.com/utah-hypnobirthing-classes.

4. What was the hardest part of your experience – before, during, or after childbirth? 
Not being able to move around during labor made it hard for me to relax and get comfortable. Laying on the bed put more pressure on my body.

5. What was most helpful to you during labor to help make pain from contractions manageable?
My wonderful husband pushed on my lower back every time I had a contraction. I couldn’t believe how it took the pain out of my back. It helped me focus on controlling the pain in my lower regions.

6. What do you wish you would have known going into delivery? 
That no matter how hard you try, you can’t plan on anything. I made a birth plan but after they found meconium in the water, it all went out the window.

7. Is there anything you would have done differently?
The one thing I regret is not sticking up for myself and what I wanted. The number 1 thing I wanted was that baby handed to me when he was born. I understand they had to check him but they didn’t hand me my baby until 40 minutes after I’d given birth!!! The Dr. wanted to stitch me up first. Oh! There’s another thing. I would have found a different Dr. when I found out he wasn’t really into natural childbirth (but I wouldn’t recommend Dr. Jae Baxter to anyone.) I’m finding a woman/someone who’s actually given birth – OB or a midwife next time.

8. What did you feel were the positive benefits to your natural childbirth – were the benefits what you expected? I think for with Jude’s birth, if I would have had an epidural, it would have caused more stress and prolonged the labor. I didn’t know how calm and aware my baby would be without medicine. And I felt good right after birth. I guess I shouldn’t say “good” but I was able to get up and move around and go to the bathroom by myself.

9. Is natural childbirth something you recommend to other mothers, or something you’d do again?I would highly recommend it to other mothers! I know that it’s just not possible for some people but I think the relaxation and breathing techniques are great for everyone to learn, whether you’re planning on natural childbirth or not. I definitely plan on doing it again.


10. What advice do you have for other mothers interested in natural childbirth?Do what feels right for you and your baby whether it’s having a midwife or doula. Whether you want to give birth in a hospital or birthing center, at home or in a tub. Do what feels best to you. You can’t plan on anything but stick up for what you really want.

Thanks for a great fundraiser!

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Thanks for a great fundraiser!

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Breastfeeding Blog Carnival

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World Breastfeeding Week

If you’re interested in joining a breastfeeding blog carnival for World Breastfeeding Week, please see this call for entries!

Callum

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Emily, age 26.

as we approached my 36 week appointment i think we were all a little bit curious to see if things would replay the way they went with my first baby’s birth only 16 months previously. i posted his birth story to this blog and you can read it here.
but basically, it was super fast, and i was unknowingly dilated to a 6 at my 37 week appointment and told to head to the hospital.
but, back to Callum. the a few nights that week i had contractions, and then they would go away. my midwife and just about everyone else insisted from the beginning of my pregnancy that if i had hard contractions, ever, to go to the hospital. their words like “have, baby, in, car, on, side of road” haunted me.

saturday july 23rd i had contractions every 5-10 minutes for 3 hours. i called my midwife, she told me to take a bath and if they kept coming to go to the hospital. sure enough after the bath they kept coming. so i got in the car and went to the hospital. no hospital bag, no husband, no plan of staying because i was pretty sure this wasn’t “it.” but, obediently, i went in.

the nurse checked me… i was still a 4. i was shocked. she made me stay another hour to monitor me, and without fail contractions came every 7 minutes. she checked me again at the end of the hour, i was still a 4+. all in all it was a good experience, now i knew that i could have a contraction that doesn’t equal baby! on the side of the road!

after no real action for the next couple days, i was prepared for just about anything when i walked into my 37 week appointment. everything except what actually happened, of course.
my midwife checked me and sat with her arm WAY in there for at least 30 seconds without saying a single word. she finally looked up and said “i literally couldn’t find your cervix, you’re dilated to an 8 and 100% effaced… i. i. i. just can’t believe it.”

a rush of excitement & nervous laughter overcame me. it’s baby time! and once again, i had no idea. the on-call midwife met me at the office and we made a game plan. just like with my first, i tested positive for strep B, which can i just say: strep B is the wrench in my baby delivering machine?!


the plan ended up being just like Hayes’. come to the hospital & get the 4-hour antibiotic treatment. i asked if i could just go home after the treatment and wait to really go into labor, but they said absolutely not.
so, i packed my hospital bag, took a shower, called my sister to come watch Hayes, and got things ready to head out the door. 

here’s the play by play: at 12:30 pm i get the antibiotics. contractions are coming every so often, our midwife Jenn says she’ll be back at 4:30 pm to break my water and get the party started. we watch a movie, Russ snuck me a string cheese, we took a nap. she comes at 4:30 pm, checks me again, i am still dilated to an 8.
aka: NOT IN ACTIVE LABOR. active labor as defined by american fork hospital is dilating 1 cm in one hour.
this is where all my mom friends start to hate me. i don’t know why, but i don’t have painful contractions until my water breaks. yes, i can feel the pressure, but no real debilitating pain. i know i am the luckiest woman in the world!

so the midwife breaks my water and my contractions are now coming every 7 minutes so it’s a pretty slow process. a contraction comes, i breathe through it, and then wait another 7 minutes.  the first 2 contractions my water is just flooding out with each one. the 3rd contraction i dilate to a 9, 4th contraction i dilate to a 10. 5th contraction i’m ready to push.

pushing hurts considerably more than it did last time. i am acutely aware that i am just getting owned down there (TMI sorry.) i can’t help but cry between every push, but nevertheless for 4 sets of fierce pushing i know i am almost done & could care less about anything but seeing that baby’s face.

Russ has been holding my left leg while i’ve been pushing and i notice he swaps places with a nurse. i realize the baby is almost here! Jenn the midwife said that if Russ wanted, when Cal was ready, he could be the one to deliver him. at 5:05 pm Russ laid him on my chest and we both just sobbed. i looked up and the labor and delivery nurse was sobbing too, it was a moment i’ll never forget. Cal didn’t cry right away he just looked around and was so angelic. Russ cut the cord after it was done surging and a few towel rubs to the back and his little mouse squeaker cry came out.


now, don’t worry, i didn’t get let off that easy. unfortunately, the afterbirth process was brutal. i felt a painful tugging with every stitch, but when i finally asked for more lidocaine she was pretty much done. and then i had to be put on a whole bag of pitocin to get things to stop bleeding. between that and the brutal kneading to my stomach every 15 minutes, i was not a happy girl for about an hour. it is true what you hear – getting your cervix to go back to normal hurts worse with each kid.

1. When did you decide you wanted to deliver your baby naturally?

This was my second med-free delivery, and I always said I could do it again if the labor went as fast as my first. 
2. What reasons or factors went into your decision?
I love all the benefits of a natural delivery, I love the self-empowerment that comes from accomplishing such a thing. And I founded this blog, so I sort of felt like I had to. :)
3. What did you do to prepare for natural childbirth? (midwife, classes, methods, books, etc.)
Nothing! Horrible right? I had a midwife and felt really comfortable that she would know what to do.
4. What was the hardest part of your experience – before, during, or after childbirth?
Pushing/Tearing and the post-partum contracting while I was on pitocin. Also, my boys are 16 months apart and in some ways that helped me and some ways it hurt me. My body was like “hey I remember this!” during delivery but while I was pregnant my poor hips and joints made me miserable!
5. What was most helpful to you during labor to help make pain from contractions manageable?
Having the illustration in my mind that any time I held tension or stress in my shoulders, head, or face, I was taking blood & oxygen away from my lady parts. Knowing that the more  relaxed I could stay, the better job my body would do helped me a little bit.
6. What do you wish you would have known going into delivery?
My midwife asked right as we were ready to push what position I wanted to push in. I had not mentally prepared to do anything but push on my back. I wish we would have discussed it earlier and I wish I would have prepared for it. She prefers to have her patients push on all fours, and I would love to give that a shot next time!
7. Is there anything you would have done differently?
Maybe pushing positions? Also, having a midwife was amazing and I felt like I didn’t need my mom to try and be so hands-on and directive, she was telling me to do one thing and the midwife was trying to get me to do another. She was my #1 support and coach through my first delivery so she was just acting on experience, but turns out she could take the day off!
8. What did you feel were the positive benefits to your natural childbirth – were the benefits what you expected? 
Having an alert and calm baby. Nursing came really easy, my emotions were manageable, and I’ve never done drugs, but the high you get is unlike anything I’ve ever experienced.
9.  Is natural childbirth something you recommend to other mothers, or something you’d do again?
100% yes. Like I’ve said before, your body successfully created a baby from some chromosomes and blood. It knows what it’s doing, and if you let it, it will do it’s thing all the way until that baby is safely on your chest. Don’t let doctors/protocol/or the popular majority get in it’s way!
10. What advice do you have for other mothers interested in natural childbirth?

I loved my midwife experience. Knowing there were doctors in the next room over for all of my check-ups and at the hospital during my delivery was comforting, but a midwife can create the most amazing experience for a natural birthing woman. We hugged and cried together while I held my baby, she didn’t even have to ask if i wanted to wait until the cord stopped surging to cut it, she let my husband deliver our son for crying out loud! It was incredible. They are just like doctors in the sense that their #1 priority is delivering a healthy baby safely and doing all they can for mom, too, but what they’re willing to try to do so without unnecessary interventions is far more vast than any doctor i’ve seen.

Emily blogs at Ruffling Feathers.



Camille

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Becky, age 28.


To read the story of my first natural birth posted on this blog, click here. The week before our second daughter was born, we walked and walked and walked hoping labor would start, but it didn’t. At my appointment that week, I was at a one. At my next appointment (39 weeks) I asked my doctor if she would strip my membranes and she did. I was at a 3+ and 70% effaced then and she was sure I would start having contractions within 6 to 12 hours. This was at 9:30 a.m. By one to two hours, I was cramping a lot and by noon I had had a few contractions. They came every 12 minutes until 5 p.m. From 5 to 6 I cleaned the house and they started to come every 4 to 5 minutes. I was surprised to see they were coming that quickly, but I was pretty sure I wasn’t dilating super fast because they weren’t increasing in pain. But of course I didn’t want to deliver in the car so we packed up everything and dropped my other daughter off with my parents. We headed downtown (where the hospital is) and decided to grab some dinner just in case we couldn’t eat for awhile. The contractions slowed back down to every 12 minutes and only occasionally would come every 4-5 minutes. We walked around the block a few times after that. We kept debating what to do since I was nervous labor might be stalling. We finally decided to just go to the hospital and see where I was at and what they said. We got to Labor & Delivery at 9 p.m. They put the monitors on and when a contraction came on, the nurse felt my belly and said,“WOW, that one is hard.” I said, “Yeah, I hope they’re doing something good!” Then she checked me. I was 3+ and 70% effaced. I was SO disappointed. 9 hours of contracting and I hadn’t progressed at all.


 She told us to walk around for an hour and then she would check me again to see if I had progressed. We walked around and they started coming every 4-5 minutes again, and when I was checked again, she said I was definitely at a 4 and that because I had progressed, she’d call the doctor and see if they’d let me be admitted. While we had been walking that hour, I had a thought come to my mind that I should try squatting. I pulled out pictures of squatting positions from some labor info I had brought. I found that there were two that really helped. One was my husband sitting on a chair and I would squat back into his legs and rest my armpits on his legs. It helped with the back labor and also said it helped the baby descend more quickly. The other one was when we were standing, he’d hold his arms out and I’d drop back onto them and he’d hold all my weight under my armpits. That one was physically exhausting for him so I tried to do that one only while walking the halls if there wasn’t a chair near. The nurse ended up having two emergency deliveries and came back 2 hours later at midnight. She checked me and I was at a 4+. Talk about slow progression.


My husband kept telling me, “As soon as you get to a 5, things are going to go SO fast.” I wanted to believe it because it’s true for most, but I just couldn’t believe it for me. Our nurse came in and said the exact same thing. I told them I’d like to believe it, but I would only be able to believe it when I saw it. The nurse asked how long my first labor was and I said almost 20 hours. She said, “We’ll definitely beat that; things go so much faster the second time.” (In the end, it was a total of 18 hours, so I did beat it, but not how I had hoped…!) The nurse was able to call the doctor then and she admitted me. She went in and out doing admitting stuff and then came in and said she’d like to check me because she’d seen that at a peak of a contraction it had sharply dropped which usually meant more pressure. She said I was at a 5. From 12 to 12:40 a.m. we walked more and then were monitored again. I was pretty exhausted so I suggested we should try to sleep through an hour of monitoring and see what happened. I didn’t sleep, but at least I closed my eyes and rested from 1 to 2 a.m. It was needed. My husband slept too and I was glad because I could tell he was exhausted too. At 2:30 a.m., I was at my end. She checked me and I was at a 6 and 90% effaced. Every time she checked me it was really painful and she had such a hard time reaching the cervix. I was alone and in so much pain and suffering and so confused at why things were going so terrible. The contractions were SO hard and painful and were doing almost nothing. The contractions I had been having at 4-5 cms were as hard as the ones I remember having during transition with my first. We walked for another hour and at 3:30 a.m., I was at a 6 still, but the cervix was not posterior anymore. I asked if breaking my water would help and she said she’d call my doctor at 6 a.m. and ask her. I was really not cool with that because that was still a couple hours away. She came back a few minutes later and asked if I would like her to call now. I said yes. She called my doctor and my doctor had her check me during a contraction. At 4:30 a.m. I was at an 8 and was completely effaced. The contractions started to come almost on top of each other, and I fell back into my husband’s arms during all of these contractions and squatted. We rocked back and forth a little while squatting and it helped. My doctor came in and broke my water at 4:55 a.m. After a couple more contractions, I was given the go-ahead to push. I started pushing at 5:19 a.m. I pushed on my left side and curled my body down so hard every time I pushed. With my first, they helped me count every push, but this time I was just going almost nonstop for minutes just trying to get her out. For some reason, I really thought that it would be very quick, very few pushes and she’d be out. So many of friends have had the quickest pushing experiences their second time around and I just figured I’d be the same, especially since I was really pushing and curling hard. I kept thinking I’d hear, “There’s the head!” and never did. I finally said, “How much longer?” The doctor and nurses said, “That depends on you” and I got the vibe I wasn’t as far as I thought. During one push my doctor told me to grunt and blow really hard. I immediately thought that this must be the head and she was trying to help me not tear as it came out. I felt my doctor stick her hand in me and felt intense pain, so when the head didn’t come out I was confused all over again at why this was taking so long. (I found out later that she reached in and turned the baby because she was posterior.) I kept pushing and heard, “I see hair!” and that was when I knew that I wasn’t even close. I was so disappointed knowing that I had so far to go still.


 I cried in between contractions and begged to not have another one come quickly because I needed to rest and get ready for another one. I wanted more than anything to just die, but since that wish wasn’t granted I curled my body as hard as I could and pushed with all my might. As I pushed, I held onto the bed bar with my left hand with all my might (which ended up making my iv needle hit a nerve and made my hand numb for over a week). When my husband, the nurse, or my doctor would cheer me on and say they could tell it was a good push, I was so grateful to know that I was progressing. I kept feeling stretching and insane burning pain. I was sweating horribly. Finally I heard that the head was out and I tried to touch it quickly but couldn’t because the pain was so insane and intense. I beared down as hard as I could, screaming I’m pretty sure, and felt the shoulders pass and felt the rest of the limbs come out at 5:47 a.m. I honestly don’t know that I’ve ever been more relieved in my life. It was over and she was here. I was SO happy to have her out. I knew the afterbirth would be terrible too, but that didn’t matter because SHE WAS OUT! I was elated. They had told me that they’d let her lay on the delivery table for 1.5 minutes after birth to let the blood from the cord enter her before they cut it and I was really happy to let them do that. I really couldn’t see her that well over my back, but what I could see, I thought, “Oh she’s so small!” I reached my right hand and put it down hoping to feel a leg or something and instead was thrilled to feel her fingers wrap around mine. It made me the happiest ever.


 The 1.5 minutes passed, they cut the cord, and put her on my chest. She almost immediately stopped crying and was so calm. I was bleeding so they started a bag of Pitocin to get my uterus to contract faster and they began punching it down. I was really in control and totally okay with it instead of kicking and screaming like with my first. I was holding my child!!! They let me hold her for at least 10 minutes which I loved. They took her and weighed her and she was 7lbs. 8oz. I was thrilled… only 2 oz smaller than my first and the same length. I was grateful I had had my membranes stripped and had delivered her at that size instead of bigger considering how hard it had been with her that size. My doctor began stitching me up and I began to shake. And shake and shake and shake. I laid there and shook for probably 30 minutes. It was horrible and I wished I could stop. They would occasionally tell me to take huge breaths so I wouldn’t hyperventilate. They gave Camille to my husband during that time and I was happy that he was holding her. After finishing stitching, they gave me lots of fluids since I was really light headed and almost passing out. Around now, the nurse told us that they found that Camille had been posterior and that my doctor had turned her in the birth canal and I immediately said, “NO WONDER IT TOOK SO LONG.” I know that when the head isn’t pushing on the cervix correctly that labor is usually longer and that there is a lot of back labor. It made sense why the rocking positions hadn’t felt right and why the squatting positions had. A bit later I was then told I either had to go pee or that I’d have to have my bladder emptied with a catheter. I was really light-headed, but didn’t want a catheter so I said I’d try. My husband and the nurse helped walk me to the bathroom and on the way I dropped quite a few really large clots. I sat on the toilet and almost passed out. The nurse had my husband hold me on the toilet while she grabbed a wheelchair. Because I was losing too much blood, they put another bag of Pitocin on. I actually wanted that so that I could stop bleeding so I was fine with it. The only problem was that the cramping it created made me almost pass out again. I laid there for probably and hour, looking insanely pale (according to my husband), and feeling like I’d die. Finally at 9 a.m. I started to bleed normally and was able to go to the postpartum room. In the postpartum room I ended up almost passing out a couple more times, but by noon I was on the uphill climb and did well from there, thankfully!


To be honest, I was a bit traumatized about how it all went. With my first, I was elated with how the natural birth went. This time was honestly a horrific memory for me for a couple weeks, but time is definitely healing my emotions and feelings. As my doctor discharged me, she suggested looking into pain relief the next time. And to be honest, I am interested into looking into pain relief if things go similarly next time. If things progress quickly and normally I’m sure I’ll be much more willing to try it again. I want to research ways to push better. I think I had created a sureness in my mind that I’d be contracting for no more than 10 hours and that I’d be able to push her out in a couple pushes. Everything I’ve read said it should be half the time of your first labor and that since you know how to push, it happens so quickly. Hopefully that will all come true next time…! As I think about her birth and labor & delivery in general, the more I think about how incredible it is that a body can even do that… it’s almost superhuman to think of passing a child through your body like that.


 1. When did you decide you wanted to deliver your baby naturally? 
After the birth of our first baby, I knew I wanted to do it again.
2. What reasons or factors went into your decision? 
I had done it before and it was wonderful and it feels right for me.
3. What did you do to prepare for natural childbirth? (midwife, classes, methods, books, etc.)
I re-read all the info I had saved from my first birth. I took all that info with me to the hospital, just in case.
4. What was the hardest part of your experience – before, during, or after childbirth? During.
5. What was most helpful to you during labor to help make pain from contractions manageable? The squatting positions I mentioned as well as some other ones I tried.
6. What do you wish you would have known going into delivery? Not to expect things to go fast; it gave me false ideas and hope and made the labor seem even longer than it was.
7. Is there anything you would have done differently?I don’t think I would have gotten an epidural, but I do think I would have spent almost 100% of the time squatting had I known she was posterior. Or I wish I could have had other ideas of how to deal with the posterior contractions.
8. What did you feel were the positive benefits to your natural childbirth – were the benefits what you expected? I feel empowered.
9. Is natural childbirth something you recommend to other mothers, or something you’d do again?Yes and yes (I think! Ha!).
10. What advice do you have for other mothers interested in natural childbirth?Read all these stories and all the other ones you can get your hands on. They are the best prep for childbirth, in my opinion. Also, I am 100% supportive of a hospital birth. Find a doctor who supports it and birth in a hospital. There are just too many things that can go wrong at home.

The Unnecesarean on Bloomberg.com

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The Unnecesarean on Bloomberg.com

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Informed Choice, Community and Pregnancy

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A lovely comment on the Facebook page that is a) awesome (because new baby!) and b) shows how important it is for patients to have medical information about preference-sensitive conditions explained to them and to make their own decision along with a supportive care provider and c) demonstrates that online communities can be very important.

Congratulations…
I’m pleased to announce the birth of my son on July 5th at 4:05am. He was 6lbs 10oz 19in long at 37 weeks and perfectly healthy. I thought I would get to make this announcement on my favorite mommy/birth pages including that it was a VBAC after my Unnecesarean 3 years ago. Instead I get to announce that I had a medically necessary C-section in which my VBAC friendly OB came to the hospital at 3am, when he was NOT on call, to explain the pre-eclampsia blood work to me. He discussed the process of induction and my specific situation, condition, and risk factors. He told me the truth that No it was not an emergency yet and did not push as my husband and I made an informed choice. He performed the C-section and as he was sewing up my uterus in two separate layers he told me that just 5 days ago he attended another VBA2C. I’m grateful for the information and support I have gained from my mommy/birth pages that helped me to have an informed and empowered birth. I hope I get to announce the birth of number 3 as a VBA2C. Thank you all.

Informed Choice, Community and Pregnancy

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A lovely comment on the Facebook page that is a) awesome (because new baby!) and b) shows how important it is for patients to have medical information about preference-sensitive conditions explained to them and to make their own decision along with a supportive care provider and c) demonstrates that online communities can be very important.

Congratulations…
I’m pleased to announce the birth of my son on July 5th at 4:05am. He was 6lbs 10oz 19in long at 37 weeks and perfectly healthy. I thought I would get to make this announcement on my favorite mommy/birth pages including that it was a VBAC after my Unnecesarean 3 years ago. Instead I get to announce that I had a medically necessary C-section in which my VBAC friendly OB came to the hospital at 3am, when he was NOT on call, to explain the pre-eclampsia blood work to me. He discussed the process of induction and my specific situation, condition, and risk factors. He told me the truth that No it was not an emergency yet and did not push as my husband and I made an informed choice. He performed the C-section and as he was sewing up my uterus in two separate layers he told me that just 5 days ago he attended another VBA2C. I’m grateful for the information and support I have gained from my mommy/birth pages that helped me to have an informed and empowered birth. I hope I get to announce the birth of number 3 as a VBA2C. Thank you all.